Japan’s Secret WWII Weapon: Exploding Balloons

Japan’s Secret WWII Weapon: Exploding Balloons

WWII saw the development of some zany designs for weapons, such as when the U.S. developed pigeon guided missiles and (literal) bat bombs (the latter of which were a little too effective, accidentally destroying the testing base when they escaped), or when the Soviets trained exploding anti-tank dogs. Not to be left out of the fun, the Japanese developed their own oddball weapon. Starting in November of 1944, Japan launched over 9,000 devices they called "Fu-Gos" aimed at the United States and Canada. Fu-Gos were hydrogen balloons equipped with incendiary devices that, in theory, would be transported over the Pacific Ocean via the jet stream to devastate the landscape, perhaps starting massive fires in farm fields and forests across North America.

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You Can Recycle These New Circuit Boards by Dunking Them in Hot Water

You Can Recycle These New Circuit Boards by Dunking Them in Hot Water

It almost seems too easy. With government funding, a trio of British companies recently developed a new way to build circuit boards that makes them 90-percent recyclable. In fact, all you have to do to recycle them is dunk them in hot water and scrape off the circuits with a business card.

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Are These Star Wars-Themed Rental Homes Yub Nub or Bantha Poodoo?

Are These Star Wars-Themed Rental Homes Yub Nub or Bantha Poodoo?

What better day than Star Wars Day to start planning your next Star Wars-themed getaway? The vacation rental site HomeAway.com has selected several properties that they think serve as earthbound stand-ins for famous Star Wars sites. What do you think, Jedi Council of readers?

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Insanely detailed illustrations of megacities

Insanely detailed illustrations of megacities

Ben Sack creates some of the most intricate black and white drawings I’ve ever seen. His artwork is gigantic, crammed with stunning detail. Just phenomenal. This one is called A Single Note, a circular illustration that is 48 inches in diameter. And of course, there’s a time-lapse showing him in action.

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This Disaster Housing Is Made From Cardboard and Coke Crates

This Disaster Housing Is Made From Cardboard and Coke Crates

You’d think that after winning the Pritzker Prize , one of the highest awards in design, most architects would sit back and coast on their accolades. What did Japanese architect Shigeru Ban do? He built these beautiful cardboard houses for typhoon refugees.

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Anti-Bus Laws, High Rents, and Pee: What’s Ruining Our Cities This Week

Anti-Bus Laws, High Rents, and Pee: What's Ruining Our Cities This Week

Tennessee lawmakers tried to make Nashville’s buses illegal, a dude pissed in a reservoir and Portland has to flush 38 million gallons of water, and—let’s say it all together—the rent is too damn high. This is your weekly look at What’s Ruining Our Cities.

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Looks Like Steve Ballmer’s First Tweets Are From an iPhone (Updated)

Looks Like Steve Ballmer's First Tweets Are From an iPhone (Updated)

Former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer popped up on Twitter tonight, and, if this really is his account , it looks like it hasn’t taken long for his loyalties to start shifting. Two out of his first four tweets have been sent from an iPhone.

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Electric Lights Are Too Expensive—Why Not Brighten The Moon?

Electric Lights Are Too Expensive—Why Not Brighten The Moon?

Think of all the power it takes to light up empty parking lots at night. Think of how annoying it can be when the sun goes down, yet you didn’t finish all your work for the day. Think of how great it would be if we could just extend daytime, reduce the cost of lighting up all those empty streets and garages, and keep our cities as excessively illuminated as they already are today. We should just brighten the moon.

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Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/ZBHcIwbANaA/electric-lights-are-too-expensive-why-not-brighten-the-1563939872
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Space Invaders Should Have Been A Biblical Epic All Along

Space Invaders Should Have Been A Biblical Epic All Along

Artist Dan Hernandez has an awesome new show up in New York City at the Kim Foster Gallery, combining Renaissance theology with the iconography of early computer game art—or Space Invaders meets the Book of Genesis.

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Calcium and vitamin D improve bone density in patients taking antiepileptic drugs

Calcium and vitamin D improve bone density in patients taking antiepileptic drugs

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7-Nov-2013

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Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

A recent prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial reports that calcium and vitamin D supplementation improves bone density in a group of male veterans with epilepsy who were treated chronically with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The results published in Epilepsia, a journal of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE), suggest that risedronate, a bisphosphonate, may help to prevent new vertebral fractures when taken with calcium and vitamin D supplementation.

Many patients with epilepsy are required to take chronically an AED such as phenytoin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, primidone, and valproate alone or in combination to control seizures. There is much medical evidence reporting that these AEDs may accelerate bone loss, increasing the risk of osteoporotic fractures. In fact, previous studies found that more than 50% of adults with epilepsy who use AEDs showed decreased bone mass in their hips or spine and the overall fracture risk of patients with epilepsy is considered to be larger than the normal population.

“Long-term use of AEDs is associated with loss of bone mass and increased risk of osteoporosis,” explains Dr. Antonio Lazzari with the VA Boston Healthcare System in Massachusetts and lead author of the present study. “Our study is the first longitudinal trial of a bisphosphonate (risedronate), along with calcium and vitamin D supplementation, in preventing and treating bone loss in male veterans with epilepsy receiving AED therapy.”

The antiepileptic drug and osteoporosis prevention trial (ADOPT) was a prospective two-year randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase IV clinical trial of 80 male veterans with epilepsy who were treated with an AED for a minimum of two years. All participants received calcium and vitamin D supplements, and were randomized to risedronate or placebo. Subjects received total body, hip, and spine bone density assessments at baseline, one year and two years following their study enrollment.

Baseline characteristics of subjects were similar and 53 patients completed the two-year study. Significant improvement in bone density compared to baseline was observed in 69% and 70% of patients in the placebo and active drug groups, respectively. Patients taking risedronate displayed a significant increase in bone density at the lumbar spine, compared to subjects in the placebo group.

Dr. Lazzari concludes, “Our findings suggest calcium and vitamin D with or without risedronate improves bone density in epilepsy patients taking AEDs. However five new vertebral fractures were observed in the placebo group and none in the active medication group. Adding risedronate to the supplements appears to prevent new fractures in this group of veterans.”

The authors caution that therapy with antiresorptive agents should be limited to five years to reduce side effects associated with long-term use of this group of drugs including osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical femoral fractures. Researchers recommend future studies of efficacy and safety with the long-term use of bisphosphonates in patients with epilepsy.

###

This study is published in Epilepsia. Media wishing to receive a PDF of this article may contact sciencenewsroom@wiley.com.

Full citation: “Prevention of Bone Loss and Vertebral Fractures in Patients with Chronic EpilepsyAntiepileptic Drug and Osteoporosis Prevention Trial.” Antonio A. Lazzari, Philip M. Dussault, Manisha Thakore-James, David Gagnon, Errol Baker, Samuel A. Davis and Antoun M. Houranieh. Epilepsia; Print Publication: November, 2013 (DOI: 10.1111/epi.12351).

URL: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/epi.12351

Author Contact: Media wishing to speak with Dr. Lazzari may contact antonio.lazzari@va.gov.

About the Journal

Epilepsia is the leading, most authoritative source for current clinical and research results on all aspects of epilepsy. As the journal of the International League Against Epilepsy, subscribers every month will review scientific evidence and clinical methodology in: clinical neurology, neurophysiology, molecular biology, neuroimaging, neurochemistry, neurosurgery, pharmacology, neuroepidemiology, and therapeutic trials. For more information, please visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1528-1167.

About the International League Against Epilepsy

The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) is the world’s preeminent association of physicians and health professionals working toward a world where no person’s life is limited by epilepsy. Since 1909 the ILAE has provided educational and research resources that are essential in understanding, diagnosing and treating persons with epilepsy. The ILAE supports health professionals, patients, and their care providers, governments, and the general public worldwide by advancing knowledge of epilepsy.

About Wiley

Wiley is a global provider of content-enabled solutions that improve outcomes in research, education, and professional practice. Our core businesses produce scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, reference works, books, database services, and advertising; professional books, subscription products, certification and training services and online applications; and education content and services including integrated online teaching and learning resources for undergraduate and graduate students and lifelong learners.

Founded in 1807, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (NYSE: JWa, JWb), has been a valued source of information and understanding for more than 200 years, helping people around the world meet their needs and fulfill their aspirations. Wiley and its acquired companies have published the works of more than 450 Nobel laureates in all categories: Literature, Economics, Physiology or Medicine, Physics, Chemistry, and Peace. Wiley’s global headquarters are located in Hoboken, New Jersey, with operations in the U.S., Europe, Asia, Canada, and Australia. The Company’s website can be accessed at http://www.wiley.com.



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Calcium and vitamin D improve bone density in patients taking antiepileptic drugs

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

7-Nov-2013

[

| E-mail

]


Share Share

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

A recent prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial reports that calcium and vitamin D supplementation improves bone density in a group of male veterans with epilepsy who were treated chronically with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The results published in Epilepsia, a journal of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE), suggest that risedronate, a bisphosphonate, may help to prevent new vertebral fractures when taken with calcium and vitamin D supplementation.

Many patients with epilepsy are required to take chronically an AED such as phenytoin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, primidone, and valproate alone or in combination to control seizures. There is much medical evidence reporting that these AEDs may accelerate bone loss, increasing the risk of osteoporotic fractures. In fact, previous studies found that more than 50% of adults with epilepsy who use AEDs showed decreased bone mass in their hips or spine and the overall fracture risk of patients with epilepsy is considered to be larger than the normal population.

“Long-term use of AEDs is associated with loss of bone mass and increased risk of osteoporosis,” explains Dr. Antonio Lazzari with the VA Boston Healthcare System in Massachusetts and lead author of the present study. “Our study is the first longitudinal trial of a bisphosphonate (risedronate), along with calcium and vitamin D supplementation, in preventing and treating bone loss in male veterans with epilepsy receiving AED therapy.”

The antiepileptic drug and osteoporosis prevention trial (ADOPT) was a prospective two-year randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase IV clinical trial of 80 male veterans with epilepsy who were treated with an AED for a minimum of two years. All participants received calcium and vitamin D supplements, and were randomized to risedronate or placebo. Subjects received total body, hip, and spine bone density assessments at baseline, one year and two years following their study enrollment.

Baseline characteristics of subjects were similar and 53 patients completed the two-year study. Significant improvement in bone density compared to baseline was observed in 69% and 70% of patients in the placebo and active drug groups, respectively. Patients taking risedronate displayed a significant increase in bone density at the lumbar spine, compared to subjects in the placebo group.

Dr. Lazzari concludes, “Our findings suggest calcium and vitamin D with or without risedronate improves bone density in epilepsy patients taking AEDs. However five new vertebral fractures were observed in the placebo group and none in the active medication group. Adding risedronate to the supplements appears to prevent new fractures in this group of veterans.”

The authors caution that therapy with antiresorptive agents should be limited to five years to reduce side effects associated with long-term use of this group of drugs including osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical femoral fractures. Researchers recommend future studies of efficacy and safety with the long-term use of bisphosphonates in patients with epilepsy.

###

This study is published in Epilepsia. Media wishing to receive a PDF of this article may contact sciencenewsroom@wiley.com.

Full citation: “Prevention of Bone Loss and Vertebral Fractures in Patients with Chronic EpilepsyAntiepileptic Drug and Osteoporosis Prevention Trial.” Antonio A. Lazzari, Philip M. Dussault, Manisha Thakore-James, David Gagnon, Errol Baker, Samuel A. Davis and Antoun M. Houranieh. Epilepsia; Print Publication: November, 2013 (DOI: 10.1111/epi.12351).

URL: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/epi.12351

Author Contact: Media wishing to speak with Dr. Lazzari may contact antonio.lazzari@va.gov.

About the Journal

Epilepsia is the leading, most authoritative source for current clinical and research results on all aspects of epilepsy. As the journal of the International League Against Epilepsy, subscribers every month will review scientific evidence and clinical methodology in: clinical neurology, neurophysiology, molecular biology, neuroimaging, neurochemistry, neurosurgery, pharmacology, neuroepidemiology, and therapeutic trials. For more information, please visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1528-1167.

About the International League Against Epilepsy

The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) is the world’s preeminent association of physicians and health professionals working toward a world where no person’s life is limited by epilepsy. Since 1909 the ILAE has provided educational and research resources that are essential in understanding, diagnosing and treating persons with epilepsy. The ILAE supports health professionals, patients, and their care providers, governments, and the general public worldwide by advancing knowledge of epilepsy.

About Wiley

Wiley is a global provider of content-enabled solutions that improve outcomes in research, education, and professional practice. Our core businesses produce scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, reference works, books, database services, and advertising; professional books, subscription products, certification and training services and online applications; and education content and services including integrated online teaching and learning resources for undergraduate and graduate students and lifelong learners.

Founded in 1807, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (NYSE: JWa, JWb), has been a valued source of information and understanding for more than 200 years, helping people around the world meet their needs and fulfill their aspirations. Wiley and its acquired companies have published the works of more than 450 Nobel laureates in all categories: Literature, Economics, Physiology or Medicine, Physics, Chemistry, and Peace. Wiley’s global headquarters are located in Hoboken, New Jersey, with operations in the U.S., Europe, Asia, Canada, and Australia. The Company’s website can be accessed at http://www.wiley.com.



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Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-11/w-cav110713.php
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