Calcium and vitamin D improve bone density in patients taking antiepileptic drugs

Calcium and vitamin D improve bone density in patients taking antiepileptic drugs

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

7-Nov-2013

[

| E-mail

]


Share Share

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

A recent prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial reports that calcium and vitamin D supplementation improves bone density in a group of male veterans with epilepsy who were treated chronically with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The results published in Epilepsia, a journal of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE), suggest that risedronate, a bisphosphonate, may help to prevent new vertebral fractures when taken with calcium and vitamin D supplementation.

Many patients with epilepsy are required to take chronically an AED such as phenytoin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, primidone, and valproate alone or in combination to control seizures. There is much medical evidence reporting that these AEDs may accelerate bone loss, increasing the risk of osteoporotic fractures. In fact, previous studies found that more than 50% of adults with epilepsy who use AEDs showed decreased bone mass in their hips or spine and the overall fracture risk of patients with epilepsy is considered to be larger than the normal population.

“Long-term use of AEDs is associated with loss of bone mass and increased risk of osteoporosis,” explains Dr. Antonio Lazzari with the VA Boston Healthcare System in Massachusetts and lead author of the present study. “Our study is the first longitudinal trial of a bisphosphonate (risedronate), along with calcium and vitamin D supplementation, in preventing and treating bone loss in male veterans with epilepsy receiving AED therapy.”

The antiepileptic drug and osteoporosis prevention trial (ADOPT) was a prospective two-year randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase IV clinical trial of 80 male veterans with epilepsy who were treated with an AED for a minimum of two years. All participants received calcium and vitamin D supplements, and were randomized to risedronate or placebo. Subjects received total body, hip, and spine bone density assessments at baseline, one year and two years following their study enrollment.

Baseline characteristics of subjects were similar and 53 patients completed the two-year study. Significant improvement in bone density compared to baseline was observed in 69% and 70% of patients in the placebo and active drug groups, respectively. Patients taking risedronate displayed a significant increase in bone density at the lumbar spine, compared to subjects in the placebo group.

Dr. Lazzari concludes, “Our findings suggest calcium and vitamin D with or without risedronate improves bone density in epilepsy patients taking AEDs. However five new vertebral fractures were observed in the placebo group and none in the active medication group. Adding risedronate to the supplements appears to prevent new fractures in this group of veterans.”

The authors caution that therapy with antiresorptive agents should be limited to five years to reduce side effects associated with long-term use of this group of drugs including osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical femoral fractures. Researchers recommend future studies of efficacy and safety with the long-term use of bisphosphonates in patients with epilepsy.

###

This study is published in Epilepsia. Media wishing to receive a PDF of this article may contact sciencenewsroom@wiley.com.

Full citation: “Prevention of Bone Loss and Vertebral Fractures in Patients with Chronic EpilepsyAntiepileptic Drug and Osteoporosis Prevention Trial.” Antonio A. Lazzari, Philip M. Dussault, Manisha Thakore-James, David Gagnon, Errol Baker, Samuel A. Davis and Antoun M. Houranieh. Epilepsia; Print Publication: November, 2013 (DOI: 10.1111/epi.12351).

URL: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/epi.12351

Author Contact: Media wishing to speak with Dr. Lazzari may contact antonio.lazzari@va.gov.

About the Journal

Epilepsia is the leading, most authoritative source for current clinical and research results on all aspects of epilepsy. As the journal of the International League Against Epilepsy, subscribers every month will review scientific evidence and clinical methodology in: clinical neurology, neurophysiology, molecular biology, neuroimaging, neurochemistry, neurosurgery, pharmacology, neuroepidemiology, and therapeutic trials. For more information, please visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1528-1167.

About the International League Against Epilepsy

The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) is the world’s preeminent association of physicians and health professionals working toward a world where no person’s life is limited by epilepsy. Since 1909 the ILAE has provided educational and research resources that are essential in understanding, diagnosing and treating persons with epilepsy. The ILAE supports health professionals, patients, and their care providers, governments, and the general public worldwide by advancing knowledge of epilepsy.

About Wiley

Wiley is a global provider of content-enabled solutions that improve outcomes in research, education, and professional practice. Our core businesses produce scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, reference works, books, database services, and advertising; professional books, subscription products, certification and training services and online applications; and education content and services including integrated online teaching and learning resources for undergraduate and graduate students and lifelong learners.

Founded in 1807, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (NYSE: JWa, JWb), has been a valued source of information and understanding for more than 200 years, helping people around the world meet their needs and fulfill their aspirations. Wiley and its acquired companies have published the works of more than 450 Nobel laureates in all categories: Literature, Economics, Physiology or Medicine, Physics, Chemistry, and Peace. Wiley’s global headquarters are located in Hoboken, New Jersey, with operations in the U.S., Europe, Asia, Canada, and Australia. The Company’s website can be accessed at http://www.wiley.com.



[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

[

| E-mail


Share Share

]

 

AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

Calcium and vitamin D improve bone density in patients taking antiepileptic drugs

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

7-Nov-2013

[

| E-mail

]


Share Share

Contact: Dawn Peters
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com
781-388-8408
Wiley

A recent prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial reports that calcium and vitamin D supplementation improves bone density in a group of male veterans with epilepsy who were treated chronically with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The results published in Epilepsia, a journal of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE), suggest that risedronate, a bisphosphonate, may help to prevent new vertebral fractures when taken with calcium and vitamin D supplementation.

Many patients with epilepsy are required to take chronically an AED such as phenytoin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, primidone, and valproate alone or in combination to control seizures. There is much medical evidence reporting that these AEDs may accelerate bone loss, increasing the risk of osteoporotic fractures. In fact, previous studies found that more than 50% of adults with epilepsy who use AEDs showed decreased bone mass in their hips or spine and the overall fracture risk of patients with epilepsy is considered to be larger than the normal population.

“Long-term use of AEDs is associated with loss of bone mass and increased risk of osteoporosis,” explains Dr. Antonio Lazzari with the VA Boston Healthcare System in Massachusetts and lead author of the present study. “Our study is the first longitudinal trial of a bisphosphonate (risedronate), along with calcium and vitamin D supplementation, in preventing and treating bone loss in male veterans with epilepsy receiving AED therapy.”

The antiepileptic drug and osteoporosis prevention trial (ADOPT) was a prospective two-year randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase IV clinical trial of 80 male veterans with epilepsy who were treated with an AED for a minimum of two years. All participants received calcium and vitamin D supplements, and were randomized to risedronate or placebo. Subjects received total body, hip, and spine bone density assessments at baseline, one year and two years following their study enrollment.

Baseline characteristics of subjects were similar and 53 patients completed the two-year study. Significant improvement in bone density compared to baseline was observed in 69% and 70% of patients in the placebo and active drug groups, respectively. Patients taking risedronate displayed a significant increase in bone density at the lumbar spine, compared to subjects in the placebo group.

Dr. Lazzari concludes, “Our findings suggest calcium and vitamin D with or without risedronate improves bone density in epilepsy patients taking AEDs. However five new vertebral fractures were observed in the placebo group and none in the active medication group. Adding risedronate to the supplements appears to prevent new fractures in this group of veterans.”

The authors caution that therapy with antiresorptive agents should be limited to five years to reduce side effects associated with long-term use of this group of drugs including osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical femoral fractures. Researchers recommend future studies of efficacy and safety with the long-term use of bisphosphonates in patients with epilepsy.

###

This study is published in Epilepsia. Media wishing to receive a PDF of this article may contact sciencenewsroom@wiley.com.

Full citation: “Prevention of Bone Loss and Vertebral Fractures in Patients with Chronic EpilepsyAntiepileptic Drug and Osteoporosis Prevention Trial.” Antonio A. Lazzari, Philip M. Dussault, Manisha Thakore-James, David Gagnon, Errol Baker, Samuel A. Davis and Antoun M. Houranieh. Epilepsia; Print Publication: November, 2013 (DOI: 10.1111/epi.12351).

URL: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/epi.12351

Author Contact: Media wishing to speak with Dr. Lazzari may contact antonio.lazzari@va.gov.

About the Journal

Epilepsia is the leading, most authoritative source for current clinical and research results on all aspects of epilepsy. As the journal of the International League Against Epilepsy, subscribers every month will review scientific evidence and clinical methodology in: clinical neurology, neurophysiology, molecular biology, neuroimaging, neurochemistry, neurosurgery, pharmacology, neuroepidemiology, and therapeutic trials. For more information, please visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1528-1167.

About the International League Against Epilepsy

The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) is the world’s preeminent association of physicians and health professionals working toward a world where no person’s life is limited by epilepsy. Since 1909 the ILAE has provided educational and research resources that are essential in understanding, diagnosing and treating persons with epilepsy. The ILAE supports health professionals, patients, and their care providers, governments, and the general public worldwide by advancing knowledge of epilepsy.

About Wiley

Wiley is a global provider of content-enabled solutions that improve outcomes in research, education, and professional practice. Our core businesses produce scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, reference works, books, database services, and advertising; professional books, subscription products, certification and training services and online applications; and education content and services including integrated online teaching and learning resources for undergraduate and graduate students and lifelong learners.

Founded in 1807, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (NYSE: JWa, JWb), has been a valued source of information and understanding for more than 200 years, helping people around the world meet their needs and fulfill their aspirations. Wiley and its acquired companies have published the works of more than 450 Nobel laureates in all categories: Literature, Economics, Physiology or Medicine, Physics, Chemistry, and Peace. Wiley’s global headquarters are located in Hoboken, New Jersey, with operations in the U.S., Europe, Asia, Canada, and Australia. The Company’s website can be accessed at http://www.wiley.com.



[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

[

| E-mail


Share Share

]

 

AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-11/w-cav110713.php
Similar Articles: dia de los muertos   peyton hillis   constitution day   Apple.com   Robin Quivers  

Advertisements

Lenovo profit up 36 percent on smartphone, tablet demand

Chinese PC maker Lenovo posted a 36 percent year-over-year growth in its net profit in the third quarter, with demand for the company’s smartphones and tablets continuing to outpace shipments for its PC products.

For its fiscal second quarter ended Sept. 30, the company’s net profit reached US$220 million, an increase from $162 million for the same period a year ago. Revenue was also up 13 percent year-over-year, at $9.8 billion.

Lenovo reported the strong earnings even as demand for PC products has fallen sharply. Shipments for Lenovo PCs barely grew at 2.2 percent year-over-year in the quarter, according to research firm IDC. Rivals including HP, Dell and Acer, reported flat growth or major declines in shipments.

The company is still ranked as the world’s largest PC vendor, and makes most of its revenue in notebooks. But a growing source of revenue for the company has been tablets and smartphones. For two consecutive quarters, Lenovo’s combined shipments of smartphones and tablets crossed those of its PCs. The company’s mobile and home products business, which includes smart TVs, now makes up 15 percent of its total revenue.

Also helping the company is its large presence in China, the company’s home market where it reigns as the leading PC vendor. The Chinese market accounts for 40 percent of Lenovo’s revenue. In addition, most of its smartphones are sold to consumers in the country.

In smartphones, Lenovo’s shipments were up in the quarter 78 percent year-over-year. In tablets, the company shipped a record 2.3 million units, an increase of over 400 percent from the same period a year ago.

More Lenovo tablets are coming to the market. Last month, the company unveiled two of its new Yoga tablets, boasting 18 hours battery life. Both run Android.

During the quarter, Lenovo said its market share for the first time reached double digits in the U.S., taking its share to 10.5 percent, and ranking it fourth in the country, according to IDC.

Michael Kan, IDG News Service Beijing correspondent, IDG News Service, IDG News Service

Michael Kan covers IT, telecom and Internet in China for the IDG News Service.
More by Michael Kan, IDG News Service

Subscribe to the Best of PCWorld Newsletter

Thank you for sharing this page.

Sorry! There was an error emailing this page

Source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/2061840/lenovo-profit-up-36-percent-on-smartphone-tablet-demand.html#tk.rss_all
Related Topics: notre dame football   49ers   Anna Kendrick   Dick Van Dyke   Christopher Lane  

Clay may have been birthplace of life, new study suggests

Clay may have been birthplace of life, new study suggests

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

5-Nov-2013

[

| E-mail

]


Share Share

Contact: Syl Kacapyr
vpk6@cornell.edu
607-255-7701
Cornell University

ITHACA, N.Y. Clay, a seemingly infertile blend of minerals, might have been the birthplace of life on Earth. Or at least of the complex biochemicals that make life possible, Cornell University biological engineers report in the Nov. 7 online issue of the journal Scientific Reports, published by Nature Publishing.

“We propose that in early geological history clay hydrogel provided a confinement function for biomolecules and biochemical reactions,” said Dan Luo, professor of biological and environmental engineering and a member of the Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science.

Study: https://cornell.box.com/clay

In simulated ancient seawater, clay forms a hydrogel a mass of microscopic spaces capable of soaking up liquids like a sponge. Over billions of years, chemicals confined in those spaces could have carried out the complex reactions that formed proteins, DNA and eventually all the machinery that makes a living cell work. Clay hydrogels could have confined and protected those chemical processes until the membrane that surrounds living cells developed.

To further test the idea, the Luo group has demonstrated protein synthesis in a clay hydrogel. The researchers previously used synthetic hydrogels as a “cell-free” medium for protein production. Fill the spongy material with DNA, amino acids, the right enzymes and a few bits of cellular machinery and you can make the proteins for which the DNA encodes, just as you might in a vat of cells.

To make the process useful for producing large quantities of proteins, as in drug manufacturing, you need a lot of hydrogel, so the researchers set out to find a cheaper way to make it. Postdoctoral researcher Dayong Yang noticed that clay formed a hydrogel. Why consider clay? “It’s dirt cheap,” said Luo. Better yet, it turned out unexpectedly that using clay enhanced protein production.

But then it occurred to the researchers that what they had discovered might answer a long-standing question about how biomolecules evolved. Experiments by the late Carl Sagan of Cornell and others have shown that amino acids and other biomolecules could have been formed in primordial oceans, drawing energy from lightning or volcanic vents. But in the vast ocean, how could these molecules come together often enough to assemble into more complex structures, and what protected them from the harsh environment?

Scientists previously suggested that tiny balloons of fat or polymers might have served as precursors of cell membranes. Clay is a promising possibility because biomolecules tend to attach to its surface, and theorists have shown that cytoplasm the interior environment of a cell behaves much like a hydrogel. And, Luo said, a clay hydrogel better protects its contents from damaging enzymes (called “nucleases”) that might dismantle DNA and other biomolecules.

As further evidence, geological history shows that clay first appeared as silicates leached from rocks just at the time biomolecules began to form into protocells cell-like structures, but incomplete and eventually membrane-enclosed cells. The geological events matched nicely with biological events.

How these biological machines evolved remains to be explained, Luo said. For now his research group is working to understand why a clay hydrogel works so well, with an eye to practical applications in cell-free protein production.

###

Luo collaborated with professor Max Lu of the Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology at the University of Queensland in Australia. The work was performed at the Cornell Center for Materials Research Shared Facilities, supported by the National Science Foundation.

Contact Syl Kacapyr for information about Cornell’s TV and radio studios.


[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

[

| E-mail


Share Share

]

 

AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

Clay may have been birthplace of life, new study suggests

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

5-Nov-2013

[

| E-mail

]


Share Share

Contact: Syl Kacapyr
vpk6@cornell.edu
607-255-7701
Cornell University

ITHACA, N.Y. Clay, a seemingly infertile blend of minerals, might have been the birthplace of life on Earth. Or at least of the complex biochemicals that make life possible, Cornell University biological engineers report in the Nov. 7 online issue of the journal Scientific Reports, published by Nature Publishing.

“We propose that in early geological history clay hydrogel provided a confinement function for biomolecules and biochemical reactions,” said Dan Luo, professor of biological and environmental engineering and a member of the Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science.

Study: https://cornell.box.com/clay

In simulated ancient seawater, clay forms a hydrogel a mass of microscopic spaces capable of soaking up liquids like a sponge. Over billions of years, chemicals confined in those spaces could have carried out the complex reactions that formed proteins, DNA and eventually all the machinery that makes a living cell work. Clay hydrogels could have confined and protected those chemical processes until the membrane that surrounds living cells developed.

To further test the idea, the Luo group has demonstrated protein synthesis in a clay hydrogel. The researchers previously used synthetic hydrogels as a “cell-free” medium for protein production. Fill the spongy material with DNA, amino acids, the right enzymes and a few bits of cellular machinery and you can make the proteins for which the DNA encodes, just as you might in a vat of cells.

To make the process useful for producing large quantities of proteins, as in drug manufacturing, you need a lot of hydrogel, so the researchers set out to find a cheaper way to make it. Postdoctoral researcher Dayong Yang noticed that clay formed a hydrogel. Why consider clay? “It’s dirt cheap,” said Luo. Better yet, it turned out unexpectedly that using clay enhanced protein production.

But then it occurred to the researchers that what they had discovered might answer a long-standing question about how biomolecules evolved. Experiments by the late Carl Sagan of Cornell and others have shown that amino acids and other biomolecules could have been formed in primordial oceans, drawing energy from lightning or volcanic vents. But in the vast ocean, how could these molecules come together often enough to assemble into more complex structures, and what protected them from the harsh environment?

Scientists previously suggested that tiny balloons of fat or polymers might have served as precursors of cell membranes. Clay is a promising possibility because biomolecules tend to attach to its surface, and theorists have shown that cytoplasm the interior environment of a cell behaves much like a hydrogel. And, Luo said, a clay hydrogel better protects its contents from damaging enzymes (called “nucleases”) that might dismantle DNA and other biomolecules.

As further evidence, geological history shows that clay first appeared as silicates leached from rocks just at the time biomolecules began to form into protocells cell-like structures, but incomplete and eventually membrane-enclosed cells. The geological events matched nicely with biological events.

How these biological machines evolved remains to be explained, Luo said. For now his research group is working to understand why a clay hydrogel works so well, with an eye to practical applications in cell-free protein production.

###

Luo collaborated with professor Max Lu of the Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology at the University of Queensland in Australia. The work was performed at the Cornell Center for Materials Research Shared Facilities, supported by the National Science Foundation.

Contact Syl Kacapyr for information about Cornell’s TV and radio studios.


[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

[

| E-mail


Share Share

]

 

AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-11/cu-cmh110513.php
Tags: demarco murray   Captain Phillips   Jordan Linn Graham   diana nyad   VMA 2013  

Google+ gains new controls to give business users more privacy

Google has added some new privacy controls to Google+ to give business users a more secure way to share sensitive information on the social network.

On Tuesday the company added “restricted communities” to Google+, as a way to have conversations on the social network but with privacy-aware controls. Users can decide whether to open the community to everyone at their company, or open only on an invite basis.

[ For quick, smart takes on the news you’ll be talking about, check out InfoWorld TechBrief — subscribe today. | Find out what topics and issues affect tech’s biggest names and news makers in the IDGE Insider CEO interview series. | Read Bill Snyder’s Tech’s Bottom Line blog for what the key business trends mean to you. ]

Communities in Google+ were designed to let people start conversations around any number of topics. But Google hopes the new feature will attract business users without them worrying about spilling company secrets on the site.

“At most organizations, it’s important to make sure that private conversations remain private,” Google+ Product Manager Michael Cai said in a blog post.

Whether it’s designs for a product in beta testing, or notes from an off-site meeting, “anything you post will remain restricted to the organization,” Cai said.

Administrators will be able to make restricted communities the default for their organization, Google said. After creating the restricted community, users can share files from Google’s Drive file storage service as well as videos, events and photos. Administrators can later invite other team members to join the conversation, Google said.

Users can also create communities open to others outside the company, so clients, agencies and other business partners can join in, Google said.

Other social networking applications for business users include Yammer, Socialtext and Salesforce.com’s Chatter service.

Zach Miners covers social networking, search and general technology news for IDG News Service. Follow Zach on Twitter at @zachminers. Zach’s email address is zach_miners@idg.com.

Source: http://www.infoworld.com/d/applications/google-gains-new-controls-give-business-users-more-privacy-230303?source=rss_applications
Tags: Michael Carter Williams   Dylan Penn   trent richardson   emily blunt   michael beasley  

Gisele Bündchen Poses in the Nude for “Vogue Paris”

Showing off that perfect figure that makes men melt, the elegant Gisele Bundchen posed nude for Vogue Paris, showing off her flawless form.

The 33-year-old is showcased on the cover of the magazine’s November issue, looking sexy in a sweater, and batting her lovely lashes. However, Gisele’s pictures become much more revealing on the inside pages.

The Victoria’s Secret Angel sports a line of impressive-looking outfits…alongside full-body photos of herself, stripped down completely naked.

Putting up her nude snapchot on Instagram, Tom Brady’s beloved included a tongue-in-cheek post, writing, “Oops I think I’m seeing double @vogueparis by @inezvinoodh @emmanuellealt.”

Source: http://celebrity-gossip.net/gisele-bundchen/gisele-b%C3%BCndchen-poses-nude-vogue-paris-956484
Category: melissa mccarthy   Tomas Hertl   grand theft auto 5  

Google walks away from Microsoft’s IE9

As expected, Google today declared that it has ended support for Microsoft’s IE9 (Internet Explorer 9) browser for its own Google Apps.

“Each time a new version of [a supported browser] is released, we begin supporting the update and stop supporting the third-oldest version,” Google said in a post to the Google Apps blog.

[ Get your websites up to speed with HTML5 today using the techniques in InfoWorld’s HTML5 Deep Dive PDF how-to report. | For a quick, smart take on the news you’ll be talking about, check out InfoWorld TechBrief — subscribe today. ]

Google regularly warns customers when it has dropped a version of IE from the support list, so today’s announcement was not out of the blue. In September 2012, Google said the same of IE8, and in 2011, of IE7, as Microsoft readied new versions.

Microsoft launched IE11 last month for Windows 8.1 as part of that free update to Windows 8. While it has yet to ship IE11 for Windows 7, it will likely do so this month, based on the release three weeks ago of a blocking toolkit for the browser.

“Google’s test plans have been adjusted to now stop all testing and engineering work related to Internet Explorer 9,” the company said today.

As is its practice, Google will also begin warning users of Gmail and other services that it has dropped IE9 through messages urging them to upgrade.

Google’s policy is to support only the current version of a browser, and its immediate predecessor. Its ditch-IE9 move was the first by a major online service provider.

Older, unsupported browsers can still be used to connect to Google Apps and other of its services, but some features may be off-limits or limited, and at some point the apps may stop working entirely in IE9.

On a support page dedicated to its browser support policy, for example, Google noted that its Calendar app displays in read-only mode under IE8. In the same document, Google encouraged users that rely on older versions of IE to “consider a dual browser strategy.”

The end-of-support plan for Google Apps will not disrupt access to Google’s search site via older browsers, including IE9.

Google does not have a corresponding policy for operating systems. In fact, Google recently poked at Microsoft when it said it would continue to support Windows XP with its own Chrome browser for at least a year after Microsoft stops patching IE8 on the aged OS this coming April.

Microsoft launched IE9 in March 2011. The browser runs on Windows Vista and Windows 7. Microsoft will continue to support IE9 on those platforms until 2017 and 2020, respectively.

Gregg Keizer covers Microsoft, security issues, Apple, Web browsers and general technology breaking news for Computerworld. Follow Gregg on Twitter at @gkeizer, on Google+, or subscribe to Gregg’s RSS feed. His e-mail address is gkeizer@computerworld.com. See more articles by Gregg Keizer.

Read more about web apps in Computerworld’s Web Apps Topic Center.

Source: http://www.infoworld.com/t/web-browsers/google-walks-away-microsofts-ie9-230351
Tags: cnet   Bud Adams   Dusty Baker   Placenta   Hyperloop  

Russian fireball yields scientific treasure trove: Researchers obtain crucial data from meteoroid impact

[unable to retrieve full-text content]A team of NASA and international scientists for the first time have gathered a detailed understanding of the effects on Earth from a small asteroid impact. The unprecedented data obtained as the result of the airburst of a meteoroid over the Russian city of Chelyabinsk on Feb. 15, 2013, has revolutionized scientists’ understanding of this natural phenomenon.Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131106164150.htm
Similar Articles: Mary Queen of Scots   Mike Wayans   Ios 7 Jailbreak   Nokia   Cody Rhodes